StigData/Processed/DotNetFramework-4-1.9.xml

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
<DISASTIG version="1" classification="UNCLASSIFIED" customname="" stigid="MS_Dot_Net_Framework" description="Applicable to systems and applications utilizing the Microsoft .Net version 4.0 framework.&#xA;&#xA;" filename="U_MS_DotNet_Framework_4-0_STIG_V1R9_Manual-xccdf.xml" releaseinfo="Release: 9 Benchmark Date: 25 Oct 2019" title="Microsoft DotNet Framework 4.0 STIG" notice="terms-of-use" source="STIG.DOD.MIL" fullversion="1.9" created="3/23/2020">
  <DocumentRule dscresourcemodule="None">
    <Rule id="V-7069" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0055 CAS and Policy Config File Backups" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;A successful disaster recovery plan requires that CAS policy and CAS policy configuration files are identified and included in systems disaster backup and recovery events. Documentation regarding the location of system and application specific CAS policy configuration files and the frequency in which backups occur is required. If these files are not identified and the information is not documented, there is the potential that critical application configuration files may not be included in disaster recovery events which could lead to an availability risk.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;CODB-1, CODB-2&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Ask the System Administrator if all CAS policy and policy configuration files are included in the system backup. If they are not, this is a finding.
 
Ask the System Administrator if the policy and configuration files are backed up prior to migration, deployment, and reconfiguration. If they are not, this is a finding.
 
Ask the System Administrator for documentation that shows CAS Policy configuration files are backed up as part of a disaster recovery plan. If they have no documentation proving the files are backed up, this is a finding.</RawString>
    </Rule>
  </DocumentRule>
  <ManualRule dscresourcemodule="None">
    <Rule id="V-7063" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0048 Publisher Membership Condition" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;A .Net assembly will satisfy the Publisher Membership Condition if it is signed with a software publisher’s Authenticode X.509v3 digital certificate that can be verified by the Windows operating system as having a chain of trust that leads to a trusted root certificate stored in the user’s certificate store. The Publisher Membership Condition can be used to identify an organization, developer, vendor, or other entity as the ultimate source of the assembly, even if the code itself was obtained from a third party, such as a mirror site. Access to system resources, such as file systems or printers, may then be granted to the assembly based on the trust relationship with the identified entity.
 
Certificates used to sign assemblies so the Publisher Member Condition may be applied must originate from a trusted source. Using a certificate that is not from a trusted source could potentially violate system integrity and confidentiality.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Caspol.exe is a Microsoft tool used for working with .Net policy. Use caspol.exe to list the code groups and any publisher membership conditions.
 
The location of the caspol utility is dependent upon the system architecture of the system running .Net.
 
For 32 bit systems, caspol.exe is located at %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319.
 
For 64 bit systems, caspol.exe is located at %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319.
 
Example:
 
cd %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319
 
To check code groups for the machine, run the following command.
 
caspol.exe -m -lg
 
Sample Results:
Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CasPol 4.0.30319.1
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
 
Policy change prompt is ON
 
Level = Machine
 
Code Groups:
 
1. All code: Nothing
   1.1. Zone - MyComputer: FullTrust (LevelFinal)
      1.1.1. StrongName - 002400000480000094000000060200000024000052534131000400000100010007D1FA57C4AED9F0A32E84AA0FAEFD0DE9E8FD6AEC8F87FB03766C834C99921EB23BE79AD9D5DCC1DD9AD236132102900B723CF980957FC4E177108FC607774F29E8320E92EA05ECE4E821C0A5EFE8F1645C4C0C93C1AB99285D622CAA652C1DFAD63D745D6F2DE5F17E5EAF0FC4963D261C8A12436518206DC093344D5AD293: FullTrust
      1.1.2. StrongName - 00000000000000000400000000000000: FullTrust
   1.2. Zone - Intranet: LocalIntranet
      1.2.1. All code: Same site Web
      1.2.2. All code: Same directory FileIO - 'Read, PathDiscovery'
   1.3. Zone - Internet: Internet
      1.3.1. All code: Same site Web
   1.4. Zone - Untrusted: Nothing
   1.5. (First Match) Zone - Trusted: Internet
      1.5.1. All code: Same site Web
   1.6. Publisher - 30818902818100E47B359ACC061D70C237B572FA276C9854CFABD469DFB74E77D026630BEE2A0C2F8170A823AE69FDEB65704D7FD446DEFEF1F6BA12B6ACBDB1BFA7B9B595AB9A40636467CFF7C73F198B53A9A7CF177F6E7896EBC591DD3003C5992A266C0AD9FBEE4E2A056BE7F7ED154D806F7965F83B0AED616C192C6416CFCB46FC2F5CFD0203010001: FullTrust
Success
 
Section 1.6 above indicates the presence of a publishers key that meets the Publishers Membership Condition and is also given full trust.
 
If the Publisher Membership Condition is used on a non-default Code Group and the use of that publisher's certificate is not documented and approved by the IAO, this is a finding.
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-7067" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0052 Strong Name Membership Condition" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;The Strong Name Membership condition requires that member assemblies be defined with Strong Names. A strong name consists of the assembly's identity, simple text name, version number, and culture information (if provided) — plus a public key and a digital signature. If assemblies do not have a strong name assigned, the assembly cannot be unique and the author of the code cannot be uniquely identified. In order to create the strong name, the developer must use a cryptographic key pair to sign the assembly. If the developer does not protect the key, the key can be stolen and used to sign any application, including malware applications. This could adversely affect application integrity and confidentiality.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;Systems Programmer&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>If the application is a COTS product, the requirement is Not Applicable (NA).
 
Caspol.exe is a Microsoft tool used for working with .Net policy. Use caspol.exe to list the code groups and any publisher membership conditions.
 
The location of the caspol utility is dependent upon the system architecture of the system running .Net.
 
For 32 bit systems, caspol.exe is located at %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319.
 
For 64 bit systems, caspol.exe is located at %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319.
 
Example:
 
cd %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319
 
To check code groups, run the following command:
 
caspol.exe -all -lg
 
Sample response:
Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CasPol 4.0.30319.1
 
Security is ON
Execution checking is ON
Policy change prompt is ON
 
Level = Machine
 
Code Groups:
 
1. All code: Nothing
   1.1. Zone - MyComputer: FullTrust (LevelFinal)
      1.1.1. StrongName - 002400000480000094000000060200000024000052534131000400000100010007D1FA57C4AED9F0A32E84AA0FAEFD0DE9E8FD6AEC8F87FB03766C834C99921EB23BE79AD9D5DCC1DD9AD236132102900B723CF980957FC4E177108FC607774F29E8320E92EA05ECE4E821C0A5EFE8F1645C4C0C93C1AB99285D622CAA652C1DFAD63D745D6F2DE5F17E5EAF0FC4963D261C8A12436518206DC093344D5AD293: FullTrust
      1.1.2. StrongName - 00000000000000000400000000000000: FullTrust
   1.2. Zone - Intranet: LocalIntranet
      1.2.1. All code: Same site Web
      1.2.2. All code: Same directory FileIO - 'Read, PathDiscovery'
   1.3. Zone - Internet: Internet
      1.3.1. All code: Same site Web
   1.4. Zone - Untrusted: Nothing
   1.5. (First Match) Zone - Trusted: Internet
      1.5.1. All code: Same site Web
   1.6. Publisher - 30818902818100E47B359ACC061D70C237B572FA276C9854CFABD469DFB74E77D026630BEE2A0C2F8170A823AE69FDEB65704D7FD446DEFEF1F6BA12B6ACBDB1BFA7B9B595AB9A40636467CFF7C73F198B53A9A7CF177F6E7896EBC591DD3003C5992A266C0AD9FBEE4E2A056BE7F7ED154D806F7965F83B0AED616C192C6416CFCB46FC2F5CFD0203010001: FullTrust
Success
 
An assembly will satisfy the StrongName Membership Condition if its metadata contains the strongly identifying data associated with the specified strong name. At the least, this means it has been digitally signed with the private key associated with the public key recorded in the policy.
 
The presence of the encryption key values in the StrongName field indicates the use of StrongName Membership Condition.
 
If a Strong Name Membership Condition is assigned to a non-default Code Group the private key must be adequately protected by the software developer or the entity responsible for signing the assemblies.
 
Ask the Systems Programmer how the private keys are protected.
 
Private keys are simply values stored as strings of data. Keys can be stored in files on the file system or in a centralized data repository.
 
Adequate protection methods include, but are not limited to:
 
 - utilizing centralized key management;
 - using strict file permissions to limit access; and
 - tying strong pass phrases to the key.
 
If the private key used to sign the assembly is not adequately protected, this is a finding.</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-7070" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0060 Remoting Services Auth and Encryption HTTP Channel." dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Note: Microsoft recommends using the Windows Communication Framework (WCF) rather than using .Net remoting. New development projects should refrain from using .Net remoting capabilities whenever possible.
 
.NET remoting provides the capability to build widely distributed applications. The application components may reside all on one computer or they may be spread out across the enclave. .NET client applications can make remoting calls to use objects in other processes on the same computer or on any other computer that is reachable over the network. .NET remoting can also be used to communicate with other application domains within the same process. Remoting is achieved via the exposure of endpoints that can be used to establish remote connectivity.
 
Normally when application code attempts to access a protected resource, a stack walk is performed to ensure that all stack frames have permission to access the resource. However, with .Net 4.0, when a call is made on a remote object, this stack walk is not performed across the remoting boundary. The .Net remoting infrastructure requires FullTrust permission to execute on either the client or the server.
 
Due to the fact that FullTrust permission is required, Remoting endpoints should be authenticated and encrypted in order to protect the system and the data.
 
Microsoft provides 3 different "channels" that are used for remoting. They are HTTP, TCP and IPC.
 
Any unauthorized use of a remoting application provides unauthorized access with FullTrust permissions to the system. This can potentially result in a loss of system integrity or confidentiality.
&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Review the machine.config file and the [application name].exe.config file.
 
For 32 bit systems, the "machine.config" file is contained in the following folder. %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Config
 
For 64 bit systems, the "machine.config" file is contained in the following folder. %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\Config.
 
Microsoft specifies locating the [application].config file in the same folder as the application executable (.exe) file. However, the developer does have the capability to specify a different location when the application is compiled. Therefore, if the file is not found in the application home folder, a search of the system is required. If the [application name].exe.config file is not found on the system, then only a check of the machine.config file is required.
 
Sample machine/application config file:
 
&lt;application name=“remoteserver”&gt;
  &lt;service&gt;
    &lt;activated type=“sample.my.object, myobjects”/&gt;
  &lt;/service&gt;
  &lt;channels&gt;
    &lt;channel ref=“http server” port=“80”/&gt;
  &lt;/channels&gt;
&lt;/application&gt;
 
&lt;serverProviders&gt;
  &lt;provider ref="wsdl" /&gt;
  &lt;formatter ref="soap" typeFilterLevel="Low" /&gt;
  &lt;formatter ref="binary" typeFilterLevel="Low" /&gt;
&lt;/serverProviders&gt;
 
Microsoft provides 3 "channels" that are used for remoting connectivity. They are the HTTP, TCP and IPC channels. The channel that is used is specified via the &lt;channels&gt; element in the config file.
 
HTTP channel example:
&lt;channel ref=“http server” port=“80”/&gt;
 
The HTTP Channel only supports encryption and message integrity when the remote object is hosted in Internet Information Services (IIS) using TLS.
 
The above example shows the well known TLS port of 443 is not being used.
 
If the HTTP remoting channel is not configured to protect the channel by using TLS encryption, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-18395" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0061 Unsupported .Net Framework Versions" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Unsupported software introduces risks and violates DoD policy. Applications utilizing unsupported versions of .NET introduce substantial risk to the host, network, and the enclave by virtue of the fact they leverage an architecture that is no longer updated by the vendor. This introduces potential application integrity, availability, or confidentiality issues.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Determine which versions of the .NET Framework are installed by opening the directory %systemroot%\Microsoft.NET.
 
The folder named "%systemroot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework" contains .NET files for 32 bit systems. The folder named "%systemroot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64" contains .NET files for 64 bit systems. 64 bit systems will have both the 32 bit and the 64 bit folders while 32 bit systems do not have a Framework64 folder.
 
Within each of the aforementioned folders are the individual folder names that contain the corresponding versions of the .NET Framework:
 
v4.0.30319
v3.5
v3.0
v2.0.50727
v1.1.4322
v1.0.3705
 
Search for all the Mscorlib.dll files in the %systemroot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework folder and the %systemroot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64 folder if the folder exists. Click on each of the files, view properties, and click version tab to determine the version installed. If there is no Mscorlib.dll, there is no installed version of .Net Framework in that directory.
 
More specific information on determining versions of .Net Framework installed can be found at the following link. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/318785
 
Verify extended support is available for the installed versions of .Net Framework.
 
Verify the .Net Framework support dates with Microsoft Product Lifecycle Search link.
http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/?sort=PN&amp;alpha=.NET+Framework
 
Beginning with .NET 3.5 SP1, the .NET Framework is considered a Component of the Windows OS. Components follow the Support Lifecycle policy of their parent product or platform.
 
If any versions of the .Net Framework are installed and support is no longer available, this is a finding.
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30926" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0062 Administering FIPS Policy" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;FIPS encryption is configured via .NET configuration files. There are numerous configuration files that affect different aspects of .Net behavior. The .NET config files are described below.
 
Machine Configuration Files:
The machine configuration file, Machine.config, contains settings that apply to an entire computer. This file is located in the %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Config directory for 32 bit .NET 4 installations and %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\Config for 64 bit systems. Machine.config contains configuration settings for machine-wide assembly binding, built-in remoting channels, and ASP.NET.
 
Application Configuration Files:
Application configuration files contain settings specific to an application. If checking these files, a .NET review of a specific .NET application is most likely being conducted. These files contain configuration settings that the Common Language Runtime reads (such as assembly binding policy, remoting objects, and so on), and settings that the application can read.
 
The name and location of the application configuration file depends on the application's host, which can be one of the following:
 
Executable–hosted application configuration files.
 
The configuration file for an application hosted by the executable host is in the same directory as the application. The name of the configuration file is the name of the application with a .config extension. For example, an application called myApp.exe can be associated with a configuration file called myApp.exe.config.
 
Internet Explorer-hosted application configuration files.
 
If an application hosted in Internet Explorer has a configuration file, the location of this file is specified in a &lt;link&gt; tag with the following syntax.
 
&lt;link rel="ConfigurationFileName" href="location"&gt;
 
In this tag, "location" represents a URL that point to the configuration file. This sets the application base. The configuration file must be located on the same web site as the application.
 
.NET 4.0 allows the CLR runtime to be configured to ignore FIPS encryption requirements. If the CLR is not configured to use FIPS encryption modules, insecure encryption modules might be employed which could introduce an application confidentiality or integrity issue.
&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;Web Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;DCNR-1&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>
Examine the .NET CLR configuration files from the vulnerability discussion to find the runtime element and then the "enforceFIPSPolicy" element.
 
Example:
&lt;configuration&gt;
  &lt;runtime&gt;
                &lt;enforceFIPSPolicy enabled="true|false" /&gt;
  &lt;/runtime&gt;
&lt;/configuration&gt;
 
By default, the .NET "enforceFIPSPolicy" element is set to "true".
 
If the "enforceFIPSPolicy" element does not exist within the "runtime" element of the CLR configuration, this is not a finding.
 
If the "enforceFIPSPolicy" element exists and is set to "false", and the IAO has not accepted the risk and documented the risk acceptance, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30937" severity="low" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0064 Legacy Security Policy" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;CAS policy is .NET runtime version-specific. In .NET Framework version 4, CAS policy is disabled by default however; it can be re-enabled by using the NetFx40_LegacySecurityPolicy setting on a per application basis. Caspol.exe is provided by Microsoft to set security policy on .Net applications prior to version 4.0. This requirement does not apply to the caspol.exe assembly or other assemblies provided with the Windows OS or the Windows Secure Host Baseline (SHB).
 
When invoking the NetFx40_LegacySecurityPolicy setting in .NET 4, earlier versions of the .NET Framework CAS policy will become active therefore previous .NET STIG guidance that applies to the reactivated versions must also be applied.
 
Failure to apply applicable versions of STIG guidance can result in the loss of system confidentiality, integrity or availability.
&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Open Windows explorer and search for all *.exe.config files. This requirement does not apply to the caspol.exe assembly or other assemblies provided with the Windows OS or the Windows Secure Host Baseline (SHB).
 
To find relevant files, you can run the FINDSTR command from an elevated (admin) command prompt:
FINDSTR /i /s "NetFx40_LegacySecurityPolicy" c:\*.exe.config
This command will search all ."exe.config" files on the c: drive partition for the "LegacySecurityPolicy" setting. Repeat the command for each drive partition on the system.
 
 
If the .NET application configuration file utilizes the legacy policy element and .NET STIG guidance that covers these legacy versions has not been applied, this is a finding.
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30968" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0065 Load From Remote Sources" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;In the .NET Framework version 3.5 and earlier versions, if an application assembly loaded code/objects from a remote location, that assembly would run partially trusted with a permissions grant set that depended on the zone in which it was loaded. For example, if an assembly was loaded from a web site, it was loaded into the Internet zone and granted the Internet permission set. In other words, it was executed in an Internet sandbox.
 
If the same program is run in the .NET Framework version 4, an exception is thrown which effectively states; either explicitly create a sandbox for the assembly or run it in full trust.
 
The &lt;loadFromRemoteSources&gt; element specifies the assemblies that run partially trusted in earlier versions of the .NET Framework will be run fully trusted in the .NET Framework 4.
 
If loadFromRemoteSources is set to true, the remotely loaded application code is granted full trust. This could create an integrity vulnerability on the system. The required method to address this is to explicitly create a sandboxed environment for the remotely loaded code to run in rather than allowing remotely loaded code to run with full trust.
 
The appropriate level of trust must be established prior to enabling the loading of remote code in .Net 4 applications and that code must be run in a controlled environment. The following is an example of the use of loadFromRemoteSources.
 
&lt;configuration&gt;
&lt;runtime&gt;
    &lt;loadFromRemoteSources enabled="true" "https://my.dodorg.gov" /&gt;
    &lt;loadFromRemoteSources enabled="true" "https://192.168.0.*" /&gt;
    &lt;loadFromRemoteSources enabled="false" "*" /&gt;
&lt;/runtime&gt;
&lt;/configuration&gt;
&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;Systems Programmer&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;DCFA-1, DCSL-1&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Open Windows explorer and search for *.exe.config.
 
Search each config file found for the "loadFromRemoteSources" element.
 
If the loadFromRemoteSources element is enabled
("loadFromRemoteSources enabled = true"), and the remotely loaded application is not run in a sandboxed environment, or if OS based software controls, such as AppLocker or Software Security Policies, are not utilized, this is a finding.
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30972" severity="low" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0066 .Net Default Proxy Settings" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;The .Net framework can be configured to utilize a different proxy or altogether bypass the default proxy settings in the client's browser. This may lead to the framework using a proxy that is not approved for use. If the proxy is malicious, this could lead to a loss of application integrity and confidentiality.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;Systems Programmer&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;DCFA-1, DCSL-1&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Open Windows explorer and search for all "*.exe.config" and "machine.config" files.
 
Search each file for the "defaultProxy" element.
 
&lt;defaultProxy
  enabled="true|false"
  useDefaultCredentials="true|false"
  &lt;bypasslist&gt; … &lt;/bypasslist&gt;
  &lt;proxy&gt; … &lt;/proxy&gt;
  &lt;module&gt; … &lt;/module&gt;
/&gt;
 
If the "defaultProxy" setting "enabled=false" or if the "bypasslist", "module", or "proxy" child elements have configuration entries and there are no documented approvals from the IAO, this is a finding.
 
If the "defaultProxy" element is empty then the framework is using default browser settings, this is not a finding.
 
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30986" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0070 Software protections and controls" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;With the advent of .Net 4.0, the .Net framework no longer directly configures or enforces security policy for .Net applications. This task is now relegated to the operating system layer and the security protections built-in to .Net application "runtime hosts" that run on the O.S.
 
Examples of these .Net "runtime hosts" include; Internet Explorer, Windows Shell, ASP.NET, Database Engines or any other "runtime hosts" that utilize .Net and load the .Net CLR.
 
Security protections include utilizing runtime host security controls such as sandboxing to restrict or control application behavior as designed or required.
 
To compensate for these design changes, Windows provides native solutions such as Software Security Policies (SSP) and Application Locker (AL) which are technologies that can be implemented via Group Policy (GPO). SSP, AL and similar third party solutions serve to restrict execution of applications, scripts and libraries based upon cryptographic hash, security zones, path and certificate values that are associated with the application files. Additionally, application developers will utilize "sandboxing" techniques within their code in order to isolate 3rd party code libraries from critical system resources.
 
In order to assign protections to .Net 4.0 applications, the applications must first be identified and the appropriate hosting security mechanisms configured to accomplish that task.
 
.Net STIG guidance cannot be applied if .Net applications are not identified and documented. The lack of an application inventory introduces confidentiality, availability and integrity vulnerabilities to the system.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>This requirement does not apply to the "caspol.exe" assembly or other assemblies provided with the Windows OS or the Windows Secure Host Baseline (SHB).
 
Ask the system administrator to provide documentation that identifies:
 
- Each .Net 4.0 application they run on the system.
- The .Net runtime host that invokes the application.
- The security measures employed to control application access to system resources or user access to application.
 
If all .Net applications, runtime hosts and security protections have been documented or if there are no .Net 4.0 applications existing on the system, this is not a finding.
 
If there is no documentation that identifies the existence of .NET 4.0 applications or the lack thereof, this is a finding.
 
If the runtime hosts have not been identified, this is a finding.
 
If the security protections have not been identified, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-31026" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0067 .NET Event Tracing for Windows." dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Event tracing captures information about applications utilizing the .NET CLR and the .NET CLR itself. This includes security oriented information, such as Strong Name and Authenticode verification.
 
Beginning with Windows Vista, ETW is enabled by default however, the .Net CLR and .Net applications can be configured to not utilize Event Tracing. If ETW event tracing is disabled, critical events that occurred within the runtime will not be captured in event logs.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;DCSL-1&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Open Windows explorer and search for all .NET config files including application config files (*.exe.config)
 
NOTE:
Beginning with Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, ETW Tracing is enabled by default and the "etwEnable" setting is not required in order for Event Tracing to be enabled. An etwEnable setting of "true" IS required in earlier versions of Windows as ETW is disabled by default.
 
Examine the configuration settings for
&lt;etwEnable enabled="false" /&gt;.
 
If the "etwEnable" element is set to "true", this is not a finding.
 
If the "etwEnable" element is set to "false" and documented approvals by the IAO are not provided, this is a finding.
</RawString>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-32025" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0071 Remoting Services auth and encryption TCP channel" dscresource="None">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Note: Microsoft recommends using the Windows Communication Framework (WCF) rather than .Net remoting. New development projects should refrain from using .Net remoting capabilities whenever possible.
 
.NET remoting provides the capability to build widely distributed applications. The application components may reside all on one computer or they may be spread out across the enclave. .NET client applications can make remoting calls to use objects in other processes on the same computer or on any other computer that is reachable over the network. .NET remoting can also be used to communicate with other application domains within the same process. Remoting is achieved via the exposure of endpoints that can be used to establish remote connectivity.
 
Normally when application code attempts to access a protected resource, a stack walk is performed to ensure that all stack frames have permission to access the resource. However, with .Net 4.0, when a call is made on a remote object, this stack walk is not performed across the remoting boundary. The .Net remoting infrastructure requires FullTrust permission to execute on either the client or the server.
 
Due to the fact that FullTrust permission is required, Remoting endpoints should be authenticated and encrypted in order to protect the system and the data.
 
Microsoft provides 3 different "channels" that are used for remoting. They are HTTP, TCP and IPC.
 
Any unauthorized use of a remoting application provides unauthorized access with FullTrust permissions to the system. This can potentially result in a loss of system integrity or confidentiality.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>
Check the machine.config and the [application executable name].exe.config configuration files.
 
For 32 bit systems, the "machine.config" file is contained in the following folder. %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Config
 
For 64 bit systems, the "machine.config" file is contained in the following folder. %SYSTEMROOT%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\Config.
 
Microsoft specifies locating the application config file in the same folder as the application executable (.exe) file. However, the developer does have the capability to specify a different location when the application is compiled. Therefore, if the config file is not found in the application home folder, a search of the system is required. If the [application name].exe.config file is not found on the system, then only a check of the machine.config file is required.
 
Sample machine/application config file:
 
&lt;application name=“remoteserver”&gt;
  &lt;service&gt;
    &lt;activated type=“sample.my.object, myobjects”/&gt;
  &lt;/service&gt;
  &lt;channels&gt;
    &lt;channel ref=“tcp server” port=“6134”/&gt;
  &lt;/channels&gt;
&lt;/application&gt;
 
&lt;serverProviders&gt;
  &lt;provider ref="wsdl" /&gt;
  &lt;formatter ref="soap" typeFilterLevel="Full" /&gt;
  &lt;formatter ref="binary" typeFilterLevel="Full" /&gt;
&lt;/serverProviders&gt;
 
Microsoft provides 3 "channels" that are used for remoting connectivity. They are the HTTP, TCP, and IPC channels. The channel that is used is specified via the &lt;channels&gt; element in the config file.
 
TCP channel example:
&lt;channel ref=“tcp” port=“6134” secure="true"/&gt;
 
The TCP Channel provides encryption and message integrity when the 'secure' flag is set to true as shown in the above example.
 
If the secure flag is not set to "true" for the TCP channel, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
    </Rule>
  </ManualRule>
  <RegistryRule dscresourcemodule="PSDscResources">
    <Rule id="V-7055" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0031 No Strong Name Verification" dscresource="Registry">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;A strong name consists of the assembly's identity, simple text name, version number, and culture information (if provided)—plus a public key and a digital signature. Strong names serve to identify the author of the code. If digital signatures used to sign strong name assemblies are not verified, any self signed code can be impersonated. This can lead to a loss of system integrity. &lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Absent</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\StrongName\Verification</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Use regedit to review the Windows registry key
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\StrongName\Verification.
There should be no assemblies or hash values listed under this registry key. If the StrongName\Verification key does not exist, this is not a finding.
 
If there are assemblies or hash values listed in this key, each value represents a distinct application assembly that does not have the application strong name verified.
 
If any assemblies are listed as omitting strong name verification in a production environment, this is a finding.
 
If any assemblies are listed as omitting strong name verification in a development or test environment and the IAO has not provided documented approvals, this is a finding.</RawString>
      <ValueData />
      <ValueName />
      <ValueType />
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-7061" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0046 Test Root certificates" dscresource="RegistryPolicyFile">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Microsoft Windows operating systems provide a feature called Authenticode. Authenticode technology and its underlying code signing mechanisms serve to provide a structure to identify software publishers and ensure that software applications have not been tampered with. Authenticode technology relies on digital certificates and is based on Public Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) #7 (encrypted key specification), PKCS #10 (certificate request formats), X.509 (certificate specification), and Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA) and MD5 hash algorithms.
 
The manner in which the Authenticode technology validates a certificate and determines what is considered a valid certificate can be modified to meet the mission of the Microsoft Windows system. Each facade of certificate validation is controlled through the bits that makeup the hexadecimal value for the Authenticode setting. An improper setting will allow non-valid certificates to be accepted and can put the integrity of the system into jeopardy.
 
The hexadecimal value of 0x23C00 will implement the following certificate enforcement policy:
- Trust the Test Root = FALSE
- Use expiration date on certificates = TRUE
- Check the revocation list = TRUE
- Offline revocation server OK (Individual) = TRUE
- Offline revocation server OK (Commercial) = TRUE
- Java offline revocation server OK (Individual) = TRUE
- Java offline revocation server OK (Commercial) = TRUE
- Invalidate version 1 signed objects = FALSE
- Check the revocation list on Time Stamp Signer = FALSE
- Only trust items found in the Trust DB = FALSE
&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Present</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WinTrust\Trust Providers\Software Publishing</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>If the system or application being reviewed is SIPR based, this finding is NA.
 
This check must be performed for each user on the system.
 
Use regedit to locate "HKEY_USER\[UNIQUE USER SID VALUE]\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WinTrust\Trust Providers\Software Publishing\State".
 
If the State value for any user is not set to the hexadecimal value of 0x23C00, this is a finding.
</RawString>
      <ValueData>146432</ValueData>
      <ValueName>State</ValueName>
      <ValueType>Dword</ValueType>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30935.a" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0063 Validation of Strong Names" dscresource="Registry">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;The "bypassTrustedAppStrongNames" setting specifies whether the bypass feature that avoids validating strong names for full-trust assemblies is enabled. By default the bypass feature is enabled in .Net 4, therefore strong names are not validated for correctness when the assembly/program is loaded. Not validating strong names provides a faster application load time but at the expense of performing certificate validation.
 
Full trust assemblies are .Net applications launched from the local host. Strong names are digital signatures tied to .Net applications/assemblies. .Net 4 considers applications installed locally to be fully trusted by default and grants these applications full permissions to access host resources.
 
The bypass feature applies to any assembly signed with a strong name and having the following characteristics:
 
    Fully trusted without the StrongName evidence (for example, has MyComputer zone evidence).
 
    Loaded into a fully trusted AppDomain.
 
    Loaded from a location under the ApplicationBase property of that AppDomain.
 
    Not delay-signed.
 
Not validating the certificates used to sign strong name assemblies will provide a faster application load time, but falsely assumes that signatures used to sign the application are to be implicitly trusted. Not validating strong name certificates introduces an integrity risk to the system.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Present</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>If there is documented ISSO risk acceptance for development systems, this is not a finding.
For 32 bit production systems:
Use regedit to examine the “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework” key.
On 64-bit production systems:
Use regedit to examine both the “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework” and “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework” keys.
If the "AllowStrongNameBypass" value does not exist, or if the “DWORD” value is set to “1”, this is a finding.
 
Documentation must include a complete list of installed .Net applications, application versions, and acknowledgement that ISSO trusts each installed application.
 
If application versions installed on the system do not match approval documentation, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
      <ValueData>0</ValueData>
      <ValueName>AllowStrongNameBypass</ValueName>
      <ValueType>DWORD</ValueType>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-30935.b" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0063 Validation of Strong Names" dscresource="Registry">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;The "bypassTrustedAppStrongNames" setting specifies whether the bypass feature that avoids validating strong names for full-trust assemblies is enabled. By default the bypass feature is enabled in .Net 4, therefore strong names are not validated for correctness when the assembly/program is loaded. Not validating strong names provides a faster application load time but at the expense of performing certificate validation.
 
Full trust assemblies are .Net applications launched from the local host. Strong names are digital signatures tied to .Net applications/assemblies. .Net 4 considers applications installed locally to be fully trusted by default and grants these applications full permissions to access host resources.
 
The bypass feature applies to any assembly signed with a strong name and having the following characteristics:
 
    Fully trusted without the StrongName evidence (for example, has MyComputer zone evidence).
 
    Loaded into a fully trusted AppDomain.
 
    Loaded from a location under the ApplicationBase property of that AppDomain.
 
    Not delay-signed.
 
Not validating the certificates used to sign strong name assemblies will provide a faster application load time, but falsely assumes that signatures used to sign the application are to be implicitly trusted. Not validating strong name certificates introduces an integrity risk to the system.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Present</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>If there is documented ISSO risk acceptance for development systems, this is not a finding.
For 32 bit production systems:
Use regedit to examine the “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework” key.
On 64-bit production systems:
Use regedit to examine both the “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework” and “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework” keys.
If the "AllowStrongNameBypass" value does not exist, or if the “DWORD” value is set to “1”, this is a finding.
 
Documentation must include a complete list of installed .Net applications, application versions, and acknowledgement that ISSO trusts each installed application.
 
If application versions installed on the system do not match approval documentation, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
      <ValueData>0</ValueData>
      <ValueName>AllowStrongNameBypass</ValueName>
      <ValueType>DWORD</ValueType>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-81495.a" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0075 Disable TLS RC4 cipher in .Net" dscresource="Registry">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Use of the RC4 cipher in TLS could allow an attacker to perform man-in-the-middle attacks and recover plaintext from encrypted sessions. Applications that target .Net version 4.x running on multiple Windows versions could be vulnerable to these types of attacks. The registry settings in this requirement will prevent .Net applications that target the 4.x framework from selecting and utilizing the Schannel.dll RC4 cipher for TLS connections. Applications that use TLS when connecting to remote systems will perform a handshake and negotiate the TLS version and cipher that is to be used between the client and the server. This is standard protocol for all TLS connections. If the server and client are not configured to use the same TLS version and cipher, the TLS connection may fail. Applications should be tested with these registry settings prior to production implementation of the fix in order to avoid application outages.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Present</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Use regedit to review the following Windows registry keys:
 
For 32-bit systems: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319\
 
For 64 bit systems:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319\
 
If the “SchUseStrongCrypto” value name does not exist, or is not a REG_DWORD type set to “1”, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
      <ValueData>1</ValueData>
      <ValueName>SchUseStrongCrypto</ValueName>
      <ValueType>DWORD</ValueType>
    </Rule>
    <Rule id="V-81495.b" severity="medium" conversionstatus="pass" title="APPNET0075 Disable TLS RC4 cipher in .Net" dscresource="Registry">
      <Description>&lt;VulnDiscussion&gt;Use of the RC4 cipher in TLS could allow an attacker to perform man-in-the-middle attacks and recover plaintext from encrypted sessions. Applications that target .Net version 4.x running on multiple Windows versions could be vulnerable to these types of attacks. The registry settings in this requirement will prevent .Net applications that target the 4.x framework from selecting and utilizing the Schannel.dll RC4 cipher for TLS connections. Applications that use TLS when connecting to remote systems will perform a handshake and negotiate the TLS version and cipher that is to be used between the client and the server. This is standard protocol for all TLS connections. If the server and client are not configured to use the same TLS version and cipher, the TLS connection may fail. Applications should be tested with these registry settings prior to production implementation of the fix in order to avoid application outages.&lt;/VulnDiscussion&gt;&lt;FalsePositives&gt;&lt;/FalsePositives&gt;&lt;FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;/FalseNegatives&gt;&lt;Documentable&gt;false&lt;/Documentable&gt;&lt;Mitigations&gt;&lt;/Mitigations&gt;&lt;SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;/SeverityOverrideGuidance&gt;&lt;PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;/PotentialImpacts&gt;&lt;ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;/ThirdPartyTools&gt;&lt;MitigationControl&gt;&lt;/MitigationControl&gt;&lt;Responsibility&gt;System Administrator&lt;/Responsibility&gt;&lt;IAControls&gt;&lt;/IAControls&gt;</Description>
      <DuplicateOf />
      <Ensure>Present</Ensure>
      <IsNullOrEmpty>False</IsNullOrEmpty>
      <Key>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319</Key>
      <OrganizationValueRequired>False</OrganizationValueRequired>
      <OrganizationValueTestString />
      <RawString>Use regedit to review the following Windows registry keys:
 
For 32-bit systems: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319\
 
For 64 bit systems:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319\
 
If the “SchUseStrongCrypto” value name does not exist, or is not a REG_DWORD type set to “1”, this is a finding.
 
</RawString>
      <ValueData>1</ValueData>
      <ValueName>SchUseStrongCrypto</ValueName>
      <ValueType>DWORD</ValueType>
    </Rule>
  </RegistryRule>
</DISASTIG>